Game Review: God of Wars III


God of War III is a PlayStation 3 single player action game continuing the playability of the God of War Franchise. It begins immediately after the events that conclude its predecessor. Kratos stands on the shoulder of Gaia, urging her and her fellow Titans to climb Mount Olympus and strike down the gods once and for all. This incredible scene follows the trend set by the previous games in the series, kicking off your journey with a jaw-dropping experience that will immediately suck you into this epic adventure. The defining characteristic of your plight as you climb this sacred mountain is a breathtaking sense of scale. The Titans you are traveling with are gigantic. Kratos is but a mere speck on their colossal bodies, and the camera zooms and pans so you can fully appreciate the size disparity of these reluctant allies.

The ground you run across is part of a living creature, flexing and swaying as you dispatch the enemies who dare stand in your way. The game seamlessly shifts from a bird’s-eye view of this epic climb to an extreme close-up of Kratos in combat, and it’s simply stunning that there are no dropped frames or other graphical oddities to lessen this effect. The feeling that you’re riding a towering giant is conveyed brilliantly, and the game only gets better from there.

Because most of the game takes place around Mount Olympus, the level design feels more vertically-oriented than it has in the past, and features like the Icarus Ascent and Titan boss battles give the game an amazing sense of scale and a different feel from the more horizontally-oriented previous two games.

You can undoubtedly find little details to complain about in God of War 3. But given how well everything fits together, how all of the items and weapons feel useful, how the Titan fights are some of the most impressive battles ever seen in games, how the animation and camera angles make the cut-scenes better than you see in most movies, how the combat grapple works incredibly well, and how the visuals almost make it worth playing on their own.